Neighborhood Update: Tetherow

Neighborhood Update: Tetherow

Each Wednesday, the brokers in my Sotheby’s office gather together at our Old Mill location to talk real estate –- we share upcoming listings, discuss current market trends, review changes in our contract forms and generally exchange info. Recently, however, we headed to Tetherow for an update on what’s been happening at Bend’s newest golf resort. It turns out, the answer to that is “plenty.” Yes, it’s been a very busy year for the burgeoning community. In the past 12 months, 102 properties have sold (or are pending), including 39 home sites and 63 homes or townhomes. Tetherow Grill was just revamped and renamed “Solomon’s” (in honor of pioneer Solomon Tetherow, who led a wagon party through Central Oregon in the mid-1800s).   The new menu will rotate often to take advantage of seasonal ingredients. The renovated interior features a 360-bottle wine rack. The restaurant is open Wednesday-Sunday from 4:30 p.m. to close. Tetherow Sport, the club’s new fitness center, opens Memorial Day weekend. It’s adjacent to the club’s heated, outdoor pool and hot tub, which opened last July. Men’s and women’s locker rooms, each with their own sauna and steam room, are located on the first floor of the sports center, with direct access to the pool deck. Also on the first floor is a café with a poolside service window as well as indoor seating. The pool deck also features fire pits, five cabanas, a food cart; and grassy areas. Fitness Manager Dominic Gatto, who spent six years managing two employee gyms at Nike’s World Headquarters in Beaverton, says he wants the sports facility to become another community gathering spot,...
Earth Day Event: Habitat’s Furniture Flip Returns

Earth Day Event: Habitat’s Furniture Flip Returns

Fans of the Bend Area Habitat for Humanity ReStore, take note: The third-annual Furniture Flip Design Challenge is just around the corner. Appropriately enough, the annual fund-raiser coincides with Earth Day: Saturday, April 22. And, no, that wasn’t a coincidence: The event was designed, in part, to serve as a reminder of the ReStore’s commitment to “Reduce, Reuse and Recycle.” This year’s Flip is the largest so far, with the most diverse group of artist/designers to date. It’ll feature the handiwork of a dozen area designers, plus teams from Stemach Design & Architecture, Ascent Architecture, Junque in Bloom, Art Castaways, Grizzly Ridge Upcycle, Handstitch Studio and Jeanne’s Junk. For the uninitiated, the ReStore is Habitat’s nonprofit home-improvement store/donation center, which sells new and gently used furniture, home accessories, building materials and appliances to the public at greatly reduced prices. The goal of the Furniture Flip is to challenge local artists and designers to take furniture and household goods that others have discarded – – items that are ReStore’s stock-in-trade — and transform them into distinctive artworks and furniture pieces. Those creations are then presented to the public and sold (with the proceeds benefiting Bend Area Habitat’s efforts to enable homeownership) during a celebratory Earth Day-inspired event. This year, Bend’s premier maker-space, diyCave, and artist collective Stuart’s of Bend are hosting the event in their back yard at 9th Street Village. Having the design challenge at this new communal artist space is a real coup for Bend Area Habitat. What’s more, DIYcave has once again generously partnered with Habitat to provide its workshop resources to all the Flip teams during the...
Lessons Learned at a Habitat Breakfast

Lessons Learned at a Habitat Breakfast

I recently attended the Bend Area Habitat for Humanity‘s Build-It! Breakfast at the Riverhouse. The annual fund-raiser is designed to provide those curious about Habitat an opportunity to learn more about how the Bend-based branch of the national non-profit organization helps our local community, and then, if they’re so moved, to provide some financial support. As a weekly volunteer at the Bend ReStore, I attend to lend moral support and perhaps share my story with others at the table who have questions about the work that Habitat does.   This year’s event was, I have to say, the best fund-raiser I’ve attended in I-don’t-know-how-long. Three components, in particular, were noteworthy: presentations by Bend Area Habitat Executive Director Scott Rohrer, Bend Painting owner Tj Iams and new Habitat Home recipient Jason Graham (aka, artist/performer MOsley WOtta). What stood out? For Iams and Graham, it was the deeply personal ways in which homeownership and Habitat have impacted their lives. As someone who experienced little home stability in his youth, Iams spoke passionately about how his transitory childhood affected him and led to an ongoing commitment to helping others experience home-ownership by offering his company’s painting services to Habitat build projects. Graham’s presentation came in the form of a poem about the meaning of “home” and “community.” It was a lyrical song, really — beautifully composed, heart-wrenching and poignant, complete with a call-and-answer refrain. I wish I had captured it on film because it was about as powerful and moving as spoken words can be. By the end of the piece, you could have heard a pin drop so still was the...
Good News for NorthWest Crossing Fans

Good News for NorthWest Crossing Fans

Fans of NorthWest Crossing will be happy to learn that Brooks Resources, the developers of the popular Bend community, have purchased an additional 245 acres. To do so, they’ve joined forces with Tennant Developments to form NWX2, LLC, the entity that purchased the land. The parcel is located between NorthWest Crossing and another Brooks Resources project, The Tree Farm, a new luxury subdivision of two-acre parcels with access to Shelving Park that recently released its first lot sales (the price of which started at around $400,000). The NWX2 property, which was included in the recent expansion of the Bend Urban Growth Boundary, is bordered by William E. Miller Elementary and NorthWest Crossing to the east and The Tree Farm to the west. The plan for the area is a familiar one: a “complete community” design that includes high-density housing starting where NorthWest Crossing ends and becoming less dense as development moves toward The Tree Farm. Kirk Schueler, president of Brooks Resources and NWX2 board member, says he expects the planning process to take six to eight months. Construction, on the other hand, is expected to last eight to 10 years. The 650-home subdivision doesn’t yet have a name, although Schueler says it may incorporate ‘NorthWest Crossing’ in some fashion. About the Author Lisa Broadwater, GRI, CDPE, is a Central Oregon-based real estate professional who specializes in listing and selling homes, especially in Sisters, Tumalo, Bend and...
Bend Tops New Forbes List

Bend Tops New Forbes List

Bend has made it to the top of another “Best of” list. This time, it’s Forbes’ recently released “Best Small Places for Business and Careers.” The reasons cited by Forbes? Bend has “the fastest job growth of any metro in the country in 2015 at 6.6 percent.” Forbes also says Bend “has one of the highest high-school attainment rates” and is “a gateway for many outdoor sports such as mountain biking, fishing, camping, white water rafting and skiing.” Other numbers cited here worth note: an unemployment rate of just 4.7 percent and cost of living that’s 1.9 percent below the national average. However, the statistics featured actually encompass the Bend-Redmond metro area. To wit: It cites the population as 175,700 (Bend’s latest figure is 87,014 while Redmond’s is 28,654) and lists the median home price as $264,600. That’s more in line with the 2016 median price for a Redmond home; the median sales amount for a Single Family home in Bend for third-quarter 2016 is $359,900, according to statistics from the Multiple Listing Service of Central Oregon. Bend wasn’t the only Pacific Northwest locale to make the Top 10 on the list of 200 small American small towns (which Forbes defines as a population of 265,000 or less). Corvallis came in at No. 5, and Bellingham, Wash., is No. 10. Here’s a complete breakdown of the Forbes Top 10 list: Bend, Oregon Sioux Fall, South Dakota Logan, Utah Columbia, Missouri Corvallis, Oregon Ithica, New York Lafayette, Indiana College Station, Texas Iowa City, Iowa Bellingham, Washington About the Author Lisa Broadwater, GRI, CDPE, is a Central Oregon-based real estate professional...
New Listing: Versatile Horse Property in Tumalo

New Listing: Versatile Horse Property in Tumalo

I just listed a special property in Tumalo that just might be the ideal setup for someone interested in running an agriculturally based business. The location, which has great visibility, couldn’t be better for that: It’s situated just west of Bend on Highway 20 (just a stone’s throw from Trader Joe’s). The 6.7-acre property — which boasts gorgeous mountain views throughout the property (both inside and out) — has 4.6 acres of irrigated land (all set up with an underground irrigation system), and includes a 24×36 heated shop, large greenhouse and self-contained fenced area that’s currently devoted to the owner’s small tree farm. The property is in farm deferral, which gives the owner a tax break as long as the property continues to produce the required amount of agriculture-based income. There’s also a beautiful 3,018-square-foot two-story house, which features both a formal living room and formal dining room. The home has four bedrooms, a large open kitchen that connects to a breakfast nook and a family room with fireplace insert, and there’s an expansive bonus room upstairs, plus a backyard deck off the kitchen. The master suite includes a large bedroom (with mountain views), large bath with both a soaking tub and oversize glass-enclosed shower, plus two separate dressing rooms with vanities and walk-in closets. The property is also set up for horses, with multiple fenced and cross-fenced pastures. And there’s a good-sized pond (however, this property is not on a private well; the domestic water is provided by Avion Water Co.). Here’s a quick photo tour of the property:                              ...
The ReStore Furniture Flip Returns!

The ReStore Furniture Flip Returns!

I’m excited to once again be helping behind the scenes of the Bend Area Habitat ReStore’s Furniture Flip. This the second year for the fledgling fund-raiser, which benefits the Bend Area Habitat and its efforts to provide affordable home-ownership to low-income residents of Bend. The goal of the event is to challenge local artists and designers to take furniture and household goods that others have discarded – – the ReStore’s stock-in-trade — and transform them into unique artworks and furniture pieces worthy of anyone’s home. Those creations are then offered for sale (via live auction this year) in a fun, festive environment that also serves as a community-wide reminder of the ReStore’s ongoing commitment to “Reduce, Reuse and Recycle.” (It’s no coincidence that the Furniture Flip auction event on April 23 coincides with Earth Day weekend.) But I’m getting ahead of myself. Back in February, the ReStore invited local artists and designers to participate in the Flip and showcase their DIY skills by creating between one and three pieces to be sold at the Flip event. The rules were straightforward: “Take something that might have been destined for the dump and give it a new life.” Seventeen designers/teams signed on to take the challenge. The group assembled in late March to review the rules, shop the store and learn this year’s three themes.   Here’s an overview of the themes: Inside Out: Transform items originally intended for use indoors into furniture or décor (or perhaps a party game?) that’s ideal for a backyard patio, entertaining space or garden. Bright Ideas: Rethink lighting -– whether by revamping a light fixture,...
The Bend UGB-Affordable Housing Connection

The Bend UGB-Affordable Housing Connection

In the increasingly common discussion about Bend’s affordable-housing crisis, one word is a constant. Three letters, actually: U-G-B. It stands for Urban Growth Boundary, and it’s a prime reason we’re in the mess we’re in right now. The truth is, when it comes to housing, Bend is behind the eight-ball. For several years, the demand to live in Bend has far exceeded the supply of homes in which to live (whether for sale or rent). Meanwhile, the price for a home in Bend has steadily risen: In February, the median price for a single-family home in Bend was up to $332,000, according to the Beacon Report. As of March 30, there were just 12 single-family homes on the market in Bend priced below $250,000. What’s more, vacancy rates for rental properties hover around a paltry one percent. And, to make matters worse, the region’s Average Median Income is on the decline, according to City of Bend Affordable Housing Manager Jim Long. That means that many folks hoping to move to Bend are stuck between a rock and a hard place. How did we get here? For starters, there’s a nationwide shortage of homes. (According to National Association of Realtors Chief Economist Lawrence Yun, we need a total of 6.9 million new housing units to keep pace with the country’s rising population. The 3.9 million units currently available fall far short of the demand. Here in Central Oregon, after a lull during the Recession, the strengthening economy has brought homebuyers back to Bend in droves. But the main culprit is the aforementioned Urban Growth Boundary — and our failure to...
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