New Habitat ReStore Opens in Bend

New Habitat ReStore Opens in Bend

In this season of giving, it’s only fitting that the new Bend Area Habitat ReStore was recently unveiled. And even if you aren’t in the market for recycled building materials, appliances, gently used furniture and/or home accessories, it’s worth checking out: Bend’s revamped and relocated retail offshoot of Habitat for Humanity (the global non-profit dedicated to providing affordable home ownership and home repair services for low income families and individuals) is an impressive study in community-wide collaboration. With the donated skills of Stemach Design & Architecture and more than 27,000 volunteer hours of labor, the former Backstrom Builders Center has undergone a massive $500,000 renovation. The result is a dynamic 18,000-square-foot home-improvement center stocked with innovative details aplenty. First and foremost, the new ReStore is (no surprise) constructed of cleverly recycled materials. Here are a few of its distinctive touches: The existing building was stripped and gutted with a sizable portion of the materials being reused and re-purposed (for example, the metal roofing was reused as siding). The exterior cedar-plank siding is made entirely of reclaimed cedar decking that was donated (the cedar is intended to age naturally and turn silver over time). A custom light fixture, made of reclaimed wood and copper pipe, was designed and built by Stemach Design & Architecture for the store’s entry vestibule. Portions of the existing structures were removed and rebuilt using energy-efficient staggered stud construction and site-built windows using donated copper and insulated glass units. Most of the store’s windows and several doors were Habitat donations that were integrated into the design; all of the store’s interior lighting fixtures were donations to...

Home Design Trends for 2014

  What’s happening on the home design front in 2014? Here’s my take on  10 trends that Realtor Magazine says are noteworthy this year. 1. Reclaimed wood floors & porcelain floors that look like wood. Expect wider floorboards too (up to five and six inches). 2. Simpler kitchen cabinets. Styles are shifting from a very detailed traditional look to a sleeker mid-century modern feel with cleaner lines. Big drawers are replacing lower cabinets — they’re easier to access and offer more flexible storage options. 3. When it comes to color palettes, gray is the new black (especially the warm tones). One big exception: the Pantone Color of the Year, which for 2014 is “Radiant Orchid.” The rather feminine shade of lilac was chosen, apparently, because it “inspires confidence and emanates great joy, love and health.” Smartly, the folks at Pantone recommend that folks opting for Radiant Orchid in their interiors consider the color as an accent color or incorporate it in their home accessories. What to pair the very distinctive shade? Pantone suggests olive and deeper hunter greens, or turquoise, teal, light yellows or neutrals including gray, beige and taupe. 4. Indoor-outdoor living. More and more homeowners strive to maximize their outdoor space too, which means more French doors (and lots of ‘em). Other options: Solariums with screens or screened porches, and — of course — more elaborate patio “kitchens,” outfitted with everything from pizza ovens to flat-screen TVs. 5. Rethinking the kitchen. That means a return to bold-hued appliances, a focus on energy-efficiency, cleaner lines, the addition of tech-recharging work stations and a shift to new materials (will we...
Bend Neighborhoods: North Rim on Awbrey Butte

Bend Neighborhoods: North Rim on Awbrey Butte

If you’re looking to move within Bend’s city limits and your home-buying budget isn’t an issue, the North Rim on Awbrey Butte is definitely one neighborhood worth consideration -– there are few other subdivisions like it. First off, the setting is spectacular. The elevated location atop Awbrey Butte provides stunning, sweeping views of the Cascade Mountains. Meanwhile, the Deschutes River meanders along a portion of the northwest boundary, offering its own equally impressive views. Residents of the gated subdivision have direct access to a 10-mile stretch of the Deschutes River Trail, and also have access to a network of paver-topped walking trails that wind throughout the neighborhood. Although the subdivision spans more than 200 acres, there are just 121 home sites, all of which are an acre or larger, which gives the neighborhood a more rural feel (a nice feature, since you’re in the heart of Bend). And because the homes here are designed to blend in with their natural environment, that sense of open space is extended even further. In both planning and execution, Brooks Resources, the developer of North Rim, went above and beyond in taking this very special setting into consideration. When the neighborhood was first conceived in 2004, an Architectural Design Program was created to ensure their vision was executed as the neighborhood grew. As stated in the introduction to the North Rim Design Guidelines: “The blending of the built environment with the natural environment is the core goal of this community.” Another unique aspect of North Rim: Brooks Resources earmarked a financial contribution to the Oregon Community Foundation from each developer real estate sale within...
Cascades Academy Comes to Tumalo

Cascades Academy Comes to Tumalo

Earlier this fall — just in time for the launch of the new school year — Tumalo quietly welcomed a noteworthy new resident: Cascade Academy. And even if you or someone you know isn’t a candidate for enrollment in the private pre-kindergarten through 12th-grade school, this is one educational institution worth visiting. The design alone is inspiring. The powers-that-be at the academy (which was based for the past decade in northeast Bend) couldn’t have chosen a more appropriate space: This locale, all but hidden within a parklike 21-acre wooded site on Tumalo Reservoir Road, is adjacent to Tumalo State Park and overlooks the Deschutes River; it’s the ideal setting for a college-preparatory school devoted to integrating experiential learning, outdoor education, arts and service learning. Funded with more than $6 million in private donations (the school has assumed the rest of the expense as debt), the 39,000-square-foot campus is a study in simple yet dramatic architectural statements. The splendid $10 million facility, designed by Portland-based Hennebery Eddy Architects and built by Bend’s CS Construction, provides an example of just how seamlessly and attractively function and design can meld together. Composed primarily of a series of prominent intersecting angles, the two-wing facility incorporates natural materials and large expanses of natural light with arresting results. The outdoors-oriented campus is configured with expansive courtyards located between the two classroom wings to encourage student interaction with the site and provide a protected play area for the youngest children. The facility also includes 17 classrooms, an 11,000-square-foot gymnasium, an athletic field and walking/biking trail, a library and computer lab, an art studio, two science labs,...

Living Green: 2013 Green and Solar Tour This Saturday

As the green-building movement continues to grow in popularity, so does Bend’s “Green and Solar Tour,” which takes place in Bend this Saturday. Sponsored by The High Desert Branch of Cascadia Green Building Council (a program of the International Living Future Institute, which promotes and supports LEED and is an advocate for progressive green building laws, regulations and incentives), the free tour is designed to showcase some of the area’s most innovative sustainable building designs. This year’s tour includes five high-profile commercial buildings, along with five distinctive homes. The common thread among all 10 projects is that they’ve incorporated a variety of state-of-the-art green-building techniques and materials worth emulating. For example, the entire five-story, 88,000-square-foot Moda Health Building near the Old Mill (360 SW Bond St.) is certified LEED Gold New Construction – Core and Shell; its second floor is certified LEED Gold for Commercial Interiors. (LEED, which is short for Leadership in Energy & Environmental Design, is considered the international gold standard of green-building certification programs.) But the element that will draw many tour participants is the building’s green roof, which features native plants and xeriscaping (design that’s suited for arid climates and requires little watering). Not only does the green roof provide an appealing outdoor space, but it also offers expansive views of the Cascade Mountains. Then there’s Worthy Brewing Co. (495 NE Bellevue Dr.). The popular brewpub’s out-of-the-ordinary green elements include 9,000 board feet of reclaimed “Cuckoo” wood from the former Oregon State Insane Asylum in Salem. The building also features passive solar design, a 27.5-kilowatt solar photovoltaic solar-panel system, solar thermal water heating and a...

2013 COBA Tour of Homes: Who’s Who of Regional Design

It’s time once again for the COBA Tour of Homes. Held each year during the last two weekends in July, the tour (which the Central Oregon Builders Association introduced back in 1989) offers a peek at the handiwork of some of the finest builders in Central Oregon — folks like Pahlisch Homes, SolAire Homebuilders, Sun Forest Construction, Schumacher Construction, Woodhill Homes and Pacwest Homes, among others. Homes included in the tour run the gamut of price ranges, with everything from entry level to million-dollar options. This year, there’s also an interesting new entry in the sub-$100,000 market (a rarity in these parts!): an 800-square-foot, two-bedroom “kit” home priced at $97,500. Created by a new Hayden Homes offshoot, WiseSize Homes, the home (located at 376 35th St., in Redmond) was designed for off-the-grid living. The tour is an outstanding opportunity to check out some new design trends. So if you’re considering building a home in Central Oregon (and, these days, there’s plenty of that going on — building is up 30 percent since last year), you’ll definitely want to check it out. Like last year, there are a number of green-built homes on the tour, including a “net-zero” home (a structure that produces as much energy as it uses) at 2163 NW Lemhi Pass in Bend. Other interesting design features found on the tour: a custom “floating steel” staircase (at 61557 Hosmer Lake Dr., Bend), Frank Lloyd Wright influences (2157 NW Lolo Dr., and 2181 NW Lolo Dr.), a Pentaquartz countertop (at 2163 NW Lemhi Pass), hand-troweled plaster veneer (at 195-8 Todd Lake Ct., Bend) and an endless pool with...

Meet the Builder: Jeff Payne of Panterra Homes

Jeff Payne, principal of Panterra Homes, isn’t your typical builder, and the homes he builds aren’t standard fare. Far from it. His goal is create well-built homes that work well today — and in the years to come. His motto: “Better Homes for Better Living.” What separates Payne from many builders is his commitment to incorporating both the principals of green building and universal design into his homes. That means that not only are Panterra Homes more energy-efficient and cleaner-living than most homes, but they are also easily accessible for everyone -– including the elderly and the disabled. “Universal Design is a concept that provides the greatest amount of access for the greatest number of people,” Payne explains. “When I build a Universal Design home, which I try to do with all my homes, I’m eliminating barriers; so I’m creating zero-step entries from the garage, I’m using lever handles and 3-foot-wide doorways. These are things that look normal to everybody, but if you are disabled or are trying to help someone maneuver through a home, they’re very handy to have.” Here’s a quick overview of what you can expect when you buy a Panterra Home: Superior framing and construction An Earth Advantage-rated home, incorporating proven green-building techniques, including a super-insulation package, with R-50 ceilings, R-38 floors, R-24 walls, R-8 overhead door, low-e treated energy-efficient windows and a 95 percent efficient gas-forced air furnace Thoughtful design, incorporating beautiful wood, stone and tile finishes Energy Star-rated appliances, Low VOC paints Universal Design features, such as 36-inch doorways, grade-level entries and a barrier-free walk-in master shower with double shower heads Home is...

Handy New-Construction Web Resource Tool for Central Oregon

If you’re building, about to build, considering building or are remodeling a home in Central Oregon, there’s a great new web resource on hand to help you. It’s called Connection Depot Central Oregon. An offshoot of the Central Oregon Builders Association (COBA), it’s chock-full of building-related information. For starters, you’ll find lists of area resources for every aspect of the home-building process — from real estate agents, lenders, architects, building designers and landscape architects to contractors, interior designers, plumbers, painters, carpenters, roofers, electricians, remodeling specialists, furniture resources, HVAC systems, handymen and much more. It’s also an educational tool. So, for example, not only are lists of general contractors, subcontractors and suppliers included, but an explanation of each specialty is provided as well. There’s also a page that explains in detail how to choose a contractor. Plus, there’s an entire section devoted to green building. (However, just when the phrase “green building” was becoming  widely recognized, there’s a movement afoot to label it “high-performance building,” which is how you’ll find it labeled on the home page here.) Folks  who’d like to check out new home-related resources first-hand can learn more about upcoming events, such as the Go Solar! Central Oregon program (which provides workshops and discounts on solar systems from Sept. 5-Oct. 10) and COBA’s Remodeling, Design and Outdoor Living Show (Sept. 22-23 at the Century Center in Bend). But perhaps the most useful tool for those in the market for a new home or a renovation is the section devoted to the building industry. There you’ll find not just a list of area contractors, but detailed licensing info about each business mentioned, along with contact...