Cascades Academy Comes to Tumalo

Cascades Academy Comes to Tumalo

Earlier this fall — just in time for the launch of the new school year — Tumalo quietly welcomed a noteworthy new resident: Cascade Academy. And even if you or someone you know isn’t a candidate for enrollment in the private pre-kindergarten through 12th-grade school, this is one educational institution worth visiting. The design alone is inspiring. The powers-that-be at the academy (which was based for the past decade in northeast Bend) couldn’t have chosen a more appropriate space: This locale, all but hidden within a parklike 21-acre wooded site on Tumalo Reservoir Road, is adjacent to Tumalo State Park and overlooks the Deschutes River; it’s the ideal setting for a college-preparatory school devoted to integrating experiential learning, outdoor education, arts and service learning. Funded with more than $6 million in private donations (the school has assumed the rest of the expense as debt), the 39,000-square-foot campus is a study in simple yet dramatic architectural statements. The splendid $10 million facility, designed by Portland-based Hennebery Eddy Architects and built by Bend’s CS Construction, provides an example of just how seamlessly and attractively function and design can meld together. Composed primarily of a series of prominent intersecting angles, the two-wing facility incorporates natural materials and large expanses of natural light with arresting results. The outdoors-oriented campus is configured with expansive courtyards located between the two classroom wings to encourage student interaction with the site and provide a protected play area for the youngest children. The facility also includes 17 classrooms, an 11,000-square-foot gymnasium, an athletic field and walking/biking trail, a library and computer lab, an art studio, two science labs,...

The Perks of Showing Rural Properties in Central Oregon: One Reason I Love Working with Buyers

I love my job! In addition to working with buyers within the Bend, Redmond and Sisters city limits, I also specialize in helping folks purchase rural properties (especially around Sisters and Tumalo). That means I get a firsthand look at some incredible places. And because this is Central Oregon, that gorgeous setting can take shape in a number of dramatically different ways — from the lush Ponderosa pine forests in and around Sisters to the unparalleled Cascade Mountain views found throughout Tumalo to the mammoth Smith Rock  formations of Terrebonne and the Ochoco Mountain expanses of Powell Butte. Consequently, my clients and I often have a window to a world that most folks don’t even realize exists! To give you a better sense of what I’m talking about, here’s a glimpse of a few Central Oregon properties I previewed or showed recently:                       About the Author Lisa Broadwater, GRI, CDPE, is a Central Oregon-based real estate professional who specializes in listing and selling homes, especially in Sisters, Tumalo, Bend and...

In Search of the Spectacular Fall Colors of Central Oregon

Okay, at the count of three, everybody put down your smartphone, your iPad, your iPod, your Kindle — whatever technological devices you have attached to your fingertips, your hip and/or your earlobe. Now step outside and take a good look around.  It’s autumn in Central Oregon, and it’s gorgeous out there! Everywhere you look, a breathtaking array of incredibly vibrant fall colors awaits — in practically in every direction, from Black Butte to Camp Sherman to Sisters, Redmond, Bend and beyond.   I’ll admit, I do have my favorite spots for experiencing autumn at its finest. For a daylong immersion in color, you can’t beat the the McKenzie Pass-Santiam Pass Scenic Byway in general and McKenzie Bridge in particular (I’ve made several trips to McKenzie and have been thrilled with the results, including this scenic trip to Tokatee Golf Club). Closer to home, the Metolius River Trail in Camp Sherman is glorious and downtown Redmond is first-rate (with street upon street lined with multicolored canopies of color). No question, the best way to explore your options is on foot, by bike or by horseback. But, heck, you don’t even have to get out of your car to appreciate the show — just drive a few miles and open your eyes. (In fact, I snapped several of the photos shown here from the passenger seat of our F-150.) But whatever you do, don’t wait too long; this show definitely has a limited engagement.   To get an idea of what you’re missing, check out the photos below:             About the Author Lisa Broadwater, GRI, CDPE,...
Images from the Pole Creek Fire

Images from the Pole Creek Fire

Well, it wasn’t exactly the finale to the Sisters Folk Festival that we would have hoped for. Nevertheless, on the afternoon of Sunday, Sept. 9, some Sisters residents prepared to potentially evacuate as an alarmingly fast-moving wildfire, located six miles southwest of town, quickly gathered momentum — pouring huge columns of smoke into the skies above and around Sisters. Within 24 hours, the newly dubbed Pole Creek Fire had moved into the Three Creeks Wilderness and had grown to encompass some 2,000 acres. After two and a half weeks of holding our breath (literally), the fire now spans more than 26,000 acres and at last appears to be under control (it’s about 70 percent contained). The Forest Service estimates full containment around Oct. 15.  In the meantime, the fire has provided more than its share of tense moments and intense photo opportunities. Here’s a quick overview of the event in images:                                     About the Author Lisa Broadwater, GRI, CDPE, is a Central Oregon-based real estate professional who specializes in listing and selling homes, especially in Sisters, Tumalo, Bend and...
Dealing with Disaster: Lessons Learned at the Sisters Preparedness Fair

Dealing with Disaster: Lessons Learned at the Sisters Preparedness Fair

Last Saturday, I participated in the Sisters Country Prepared and Ready: Emergency Preparedness Fair (the Central Oregon Oregon Association of Realtors was one of its sponsors). Held at the Sisters Elementary School, it couldn’t have been a more timely event — what with the ominously close Pole Creek Fire blazing in the background. In fact, the fair opened with an update on the status of the fire, provided by Incident Commander Brian Watts and several of his peers. The news was not good: High winds and increased temperatures had kicked the fire into overdrive — by Saturday, the number of acres that had burned had tripled (15,000 and counting). After the update, I sat in on two speaker presentations provided by Oregon Red Cross. First up, Oregon Region CEO Maree Wacker provided an eye-opening discussion of the Cascadia Subduction Zone, which I had never heard of but will now never forget because of its potential impact on the Pacific Northwest. The zone exists 50 to 75 miles beyond the Oregon coast, where two of the Earth’s tectonic plates meet and one slides under the other. Historically, it’s been known to produce earthquakes exceeding magnitude 9.0 (i.e., the most powerful in the world). And, apparently, we’re overdue for a quake. Wacker discussed what we can expect to happen in the quake’s aftermath (including a major tsunami) and how we can be better prepared for it. (Here’s a video of her discussing the topic on a Portland newscast). Next, Director of Preparedness Francisco Ianni talked about the importance of making sure we have a plan for emergencies in place at our homes. In...
The Sisters Scene: Clearwater Gallery, Take Two

The Sisters Scene: Clearwater Gallery, Take Two

It couldn’t have been easy (and the work isn’t quite complete yet), but Clearwater Gallery owners Dan and Julia Rickard opened their new Sisters headquarters last week, just as the Sisters Outdoor Quilt Show crowd was arriving.  It was fascinating to watch the new gallery take shape this spring. The work was completed in what seemed like record time (you can see photos of the building process on Clearwater’s Facebook page). But until today I had no idea just what the new digs encompassed.  So I was very pleasantly surprised at what I found when I stopped by the gallery (located at 303 W. Hood) to take a quick peek. I was greeted at the door by a smiling (but admittedly weary) Julia Rickard, who gave me the grand tour of the space — which includes not only a gallery and frame shop but also a wine bar/lunch spot and outdoor courtyard. The wine bar is known as The Open Door, and it serves beer, wine, paninis, salads and dessert. The cozy bar space seems ideal for pondering the finer points of fine art, but there’s also a cozy fireplace-fronted cubbyhole that seems designed for curling up with a good book (see additional photos below). The Open Door actually extends beyond the gallery to an expansive outdoor courtyard. The inviting outdoor space/hangout features two separate groups of seating (an assemblage of umbrella-clad patio tables in the courtyard plus a cluster of bar tables on the covered porch nearby) plus a cheery blooming garden populated by whimsical metal sculptures. Some day in the not-too-distant future, Julia says, the courtyard area...

Summer in Sisters: Entrepreneurs En Route to a Shoot

You just never know who you’re gonna meet in Sisters. Earlier today, as I was pulling in the office parking lot, my head instinctively did a double-take. I had spied what appeared to be two medieval castle turrets being hauled behind a truck, parked just a row away. So, of course, I had to investigate. Actually, the turrets aren’t turrets at all — they’re tree stumps. Sort of. After talking with Dave Taylor, one of the men responsible for the stumps, I learned that these fascinating contraptions are actually hunter’s blinds.  Made by a company called Nature Blinds, the TreeBlind is designed to provide a 360-degree view from within what appears to be a very large tree. As Dave explained, the TreeBlind, which is insulated and has six windows and a carpeted floor, can accommodate two hunters. Dave and his partner, Dirk Graves, of Bend-based D&D Hunting Products, tried to convince me that a fella could sleep inside the tree, too. (I guess they could tell by looking at me that I’m no tree-blind aficionado.) D&D is the only authorized TreeBlind dealer in the Western United States (the product is manufactured in Kerrville, Texas). Based on the crowd that gathered while I was talking to the guys, I’m guessing they’ll be able to find some interested clientele in Central Oregon. Dave said they were on their way to shoot some photos of the TreeBlind in action out in the woods of Camp Sherman. Can’t wait to see how they turned out… About the Author Lisa Broadwater, GRI, CDPE, is a Central Oregon-based real estate professional who specializes in listing and selling homes, especially...
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